IDENTIFYING CARDIGAN CORGI COAT COLORS FOR
AKC REGISTRATION PURPOSES

Descriptions of Cardigan Corgi Coat Colors (now with photos)

Cardigans Without Points

Brindle and White (Primary)

Brindle is a pattern of striping upon a background color. All dogs exhibiting the Brindle "striping" pattern on a base color of any yellow-red-black (which may appear shaded) pigment are identifiable as this color. The base color descriptor is not significant from a genetic identification viewpoint and is not necessary as an AKC coat color identifier. The Brindle and White (059) "color" identifier should be circled on the blue slip. When appropriate, a "Markings" identifier is used on the blue slip.

Brindle Merle and White (Secondary)

Also referred to as a "ginger merle", remembering that a Merling is referred to as a dilution of pigment that would have otherwise been black or liver color, forming randomly distributed grey patches throughout the dog, the Brindle Merle and White has a chestnut hue where the black hairs in the brindle pattern have been modified by the merle gene. The brindle Merle and White is disqualified under the 1983 Cardigan Welsh Corgi Breed Standard and is considered to be a merle other than blue merle. Brindle Merle and White is written on the blue slip. When appropriate, a "Markings" identifier is used on the blue slip.

Red and White (Primary)

A Red and White dog displays little or no black pigmentation in the guard hairs of the coat. The Red and White (146) "color" identifier should be circled on the blue slip. When appropriate, a "Markings" identifier is used on the blue slip.

 

Red Merle and White (Secondary)

The "red merle" or the red that has been given a merle gene from one of its parents, is the so-called "hidden" merle. Since the merle gene expresses only on black based pigment (black or liver color) by definition the true "homozygous red" Cardigan will not display any merle pattern since it has no black pigment. The Red Merle and White is disqualified under the Cardigan Welsh Corgi Breed Standard of 1983 as a merle other than blue merle.

Identification may be extremely difficult for registration purposes. When identified, "Red Merle and White" should be written in on the blue slip. When appropriate, a "Markings" identifier is used on the blue slip.

Sable and White (Primary)

The Sable and White displays a varying degree of black tipping on the guard hairs of the red coat. The black tipping in a Sable and White forms a pattern which may include a widow's peak on the head, a body saddle and/or on the tail.

The Sable and White (165) identifier should be used on the blue slip when appropriate. When appropriate, a "Markings" identifier is used on the blue slip.

Sable Merle and White (Secondary)

sable merle pup2.jpg (24906 bytes)The merle gene only will be exhibited to the extent that the sable and white would exhibit black in the guard hair. Sable Merle and White has in the past been called a "cinnamon merle". It exhibits no striping pattern as compared to the Brindle Merle and White since it does not carry any brindle gene patterning. A disqualified color under the 1983 Cardigan Welsh Corgi Breed Standard, the Sable Merle and White is considered a merle other than blue merle.

"Sable Merle and White" is written on the blue slip. When appropriate, a "Markings" identifier is used on the blue slip.

 

Black and White (Primary)

Most breeders who have examined the question agree that no genotypical Black and White Cardigan probably exists within the gene pool. The apparently black and white dog is usually either a Black and White with Brindle Points which has had the pointing obliterated by white flashing or an extremely black Brindle and White. Thus, if upon careful examination of the black and white dog, any brindle hairs, striping or coloration is found in other than the normal point locations, (see below) the dog is a brindle. Otherwise the apparently black and white dog is a Black and White with Brindle Points.

If, notwithstanding the above, a dog is to be registered as a Black and White, the (019) descriptor alone should be used on the blue slip. When appropriate, a "Markings" identifier is used on the blue slip.

Blue Merle and White (Primary)

Merling is referred to as a dilution of pigment that would have otherwise been black or liver color, forming randomly distributed grey patches throughout the dog. It has been described as similar in appearance to "tie dye" on a pair of blue jeans. Again, as with the Black and White, it is most likely that a careful examination of the dog will reveal at least some point coloration. Experience dictates that most Blue Merles which appear to have no points are indeed Blue Merles with Brindle Points.

If, notwithstanding the above, the dog is to be registered as a Blue Merle and White the 051 "color" identifier should be circled on the blue slip. When appropriate, a "Markings" identifier is used on the blue slip.

 

Markings

Points are where separate coloration (either red\yellow or brindle) is observed in most or all of the following areas on the dog: cheeks, chest, eyebrows, inside ears, fore feet, rear feet, stifle and the underside base of tail.

Tan Points (Primary)

The Black and White with Tan Points is often referred to as a "tri-color" or a "classic tri". The shade of the yellow/red pointing in this and in the Blue Merle with Tan Points will vary in depth.

The red based point colors are often associated with red or brown undercoats throughout the body. At times the "red undercoat" may "show through" the top coat in other then the point areas. Further, the point areas in tan pointed dogs may extend through to the top of the skull and behind the ears. This distribution of point coloring is of no consequence. When this occurs in the blue merle with tan points it has been confused with a merle other than blue merle.

The Black and White with Tan Points is described on blue slips as (019) color + (029) markings while the Blue Merle and White with Tan Points is identified as (051) color and (029) markings.

Brindle Points (Primary)

Identical to the Tan Pointed dogs except that the color within the point areas is the brindle pattern.

The Black and White with Brindle Points is described on blue slips as (019) "color" + (046) "markings" while the Blue Merle and White with Brindle Points is identified as (051) "color" and (046) "markings".

Liver and White (Secondary)

The existence of the liver variation of the black gene has been established, although as a rarity, in the breed. As an aid to identification, think of the genetic difference evidenced in the appearance between a black Doberman and a red Doberman. (The same liver dilution can be found in a Cardigan). A liver and white dog invariably has a liver colored nose and eye rim pigment. These dilutes are disqualified for show purposes. Liver and White is written on the blue slip, along with any other applicable "markings" description.

Grey and White (Secondary)

A gray dilute gene has been identified in the Cardigan gene pool. It, like the liver pigment gene, is disqualifiable under the breed standard. The gray dilute in a Cardigan yields a coloration similar to a Weimaraner. It will exhibit a grey flesh nose and eye rims. The Grey and White should be registered as AKC code 105, along with any other applicable descriptors.

 

 

Predominantly White (Secondary)

A dog which is predominantly white should be registered as such and is a disqualification under the 1983 Cardigan Welsh Corgi Breed Standard.

(Shown at left a homozygous blue merle)

Ticking (Primary)

The Ticking marking is the "freckling" found in some Cardigans, usually isolated to the front legs and feet, and in the head and face. (It is perfectly acceptable for the show ring).

Any Cardigan previously described, including all of the Secondary colors, may exhibit the Ticking "marking" and each of the previously discussed color combinations and registrations may have the (013) Ticking "marking" added to it for registration description purposes.

Black Mask (Primary)

The Black Mask marking can be observed, like Ticking, in any color Cardigan. It appears as individual black hairs (as opposed to black tipping as in the Sable) and is most commonly observed around the muzzle and eyes, between the white and body color along the shoulders and legs, and/or on the tail. The (004) identifier should be used.

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